X-Brace Hickory Table

In this tutorial, I will show you how to make a beautiful and heavy duty Hickory X-brace Table.  Plans for this table can be found on my website in my store and you will find everything you will need for this project. This table features an x-brace on both ends connected by a pass-through trestle that connects the two that is also strengthened by a couple 45-degree braces.  The top is 1 1/2” thick and is completed with breadboard ends that are pinned in place with dowels. This table is currently unfinished but will be sprayed with lacquer.  You may finish to your liking though. So with Hickory in hand and your determination, let us get started.

First, begin by planing down all boards needed to make the entire table.  Refer to plans for this amount.  Then using blue tape, mark the pieces so you don’t cut the wrong ones.

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Once cut, I lay out my top and mark which sides of each piece will be a tongue and which side will be a groove.

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Using a dado stack, I run the pieces through on edge for the grooves, flipping end of end to center them.  The breadboard pieces will be 1” deep while all the others will be 1/2” deep.  Cut your tenons on all ends as well so the breadboard ends can be accepted too.

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Next, I lay out for the pass-through tenon that will sit on the bottom foot and be saddled by the double stub tenon on the uprights.  The tenon will pass an extra 1/8” and will be pillowed on the end.

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Using a center finding rule and story stick, I mark locations on the foot where the uprights will be.  I use the upright as a gauge to find the borders using the story stick.

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Now cut out the tenons as shown in the pic so they are a matching pair.  Do the same thing to the other end of the upright to accept the tenon.

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Cut the tenon down to its final size (refer to the plans) and dry fit together to ensure it is a good fit.

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Cut all the braces for the legs and trestle.  These will be glued and screwed in from underneath the base and pinned with glue in the place where screws cannot be used.

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Cut up block feet for the base to sit on that match the width of the base. Attach them with glue.

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Drill out a countersunk hole for the mounting bolt to attach to the top.  Make it deep enough to flush up against the bolt.

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Now start to assemble your trestle.  Attach the trestle to the feet and saddle the uprights along with the top bracket to the uprights.  Clamp it all together and reinforce with screws into the bottom of the base through the tenon and into the upright along with the braces.

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Now to finish the top.  Once you have the top assembled and glued using your tongue and groove joinery, you need to lay out the locations for the breadboard pins.

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Using a 3/8” bit, drill out holes with the breadboard in place so you have accurate holes that pass through both the breadboard and the tenons inside.

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Ream out the holes from side to side.  This will allow for expansion and contraction movement of the top.

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Drive in the pins with glue.  You may use glue ONLY in the center part of the table tenon.  Do not glue the entire tenon as this will prevent needed movement of the top causing the top to crack.

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Round over the edges and sand thoroughly.

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Locate the holes to mount the top.  Make sure the holes in the trestle are bigger than the bolt you intend to use which will allow for wood movement.

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Use wax to lube up threads of the bolt for easy driving.

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After spraying or applying your finish you now have a super strong table that will last you years.

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Thank you for taking the time to stop by and as always BOOM! 

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